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Early Days Adversity Might Grow Risk Of Critical Depression In Later Life

Researchers from the University at Albany’s School of Public Health highlighted that kids facing adversity are at a notably greater risk for critical depression. This research is available for access in the journal Depression and Anxiety. In this research, assistant professors Allison Appleton, Melissa Tracy, and Tomoko Udo explained that over 50% of adults report that they witnessed one or more unpleasant childhood event. It includes parental mental health issues or monetary hardship. This adversity has long been linked to depression in an individual’s later life. However, until now, the timing of the adversity regarding depression was not clear.

In this research, the scientists identified paths of adversity from birth through late childhood. They studied the long-period effects on depression results with the help of data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC).

On a similar note, recent research headed by the University of Queensland (UQ) came into the news as it discovered that women experiencing signs of depression are at higher risk to develop multiple critical diseases. Xiaolin Xu from UQ School of Public Health proclaimed that women who experienced signs of depression, even with no clinical diagnosis, were at higher risk to develop multiple severe diseases.

The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health studied middle-aged healthy women with no earlier diagnosis of depression or critical illness over 20 Years. This study discovered that about 43.2% of women witnessed elevated signs of depression and just under half the group reported they were taking treatment or diagnosed for depression. The research highlighted that women under the depressed group were about 1.8 times more probable to have numerous chronic health conditions before they initially witnessed depression signs. Mr. Xu said, “Experiencing depressive symptoms appeared to amplify the risk of chronic illness.”